Agile : The Circuit

Electricity

Ohm’s law defines the relationship between the voltage, current, and resistance in an electric circuit: i = v/r. The current is directly proportional to the voltage and inversely proportional to the resistance.

Agile from a business perspective is all about zoning in on what it is that is really required to offer the highest business benefit, in the shortest space of time, a.k.a. finding your Minimum Viable Product (MVP).

There can be a lot of ceremony in Agile, I get the impression that this is what takes the front seat in people’s minds, particularly those that would consider themselves “non-technical”.

Agile, to a Developer, should be about far more than just daily Stand-ups and Retrospectives.  Agile is a mindset and an approach, focusing on improvement, reducing your resistance.

It’s vital that any improvement you identify gets fed back into future sprints, like electrons flying round a circuit, this is what keeps the lights on.

Your backlog is your potential, like a battery, keep this topped up with ideas, both business, and technical and you will be able to run indefinitely.

Your voltage (potential difference), is what you can achieve between your two fixed points, start and end of the sprint; with your throughput, current, being everything you can potentially achieve, relative to your impedance.

As responsible Developers, we should be maximising output, and identifying and feeding back on anything that can possibly reduce our resistance.  Sure there will be no surprises here, but:

  • Improving build/deployment processes can help greatly, with DevOps as a discipline justifiably being huge business now;
  • Refactoring our code can make it more malleable and open to change, again another Agile principle, see Software Craftsmanship;
  • Scope changes mid-sprint can be a huge impact to output, this may not be fully understood by business owners, it’s important to feed this back, we would know about it if we waste their time, the opposite should also hold true (communication, and a good rapport is key here!).

Think about what you can do within your team to reduce your resistance and increase your output.  Talk it through with your peers and make a list of improvements you’d like to make, over time it’ll make your bulb glow brighter.

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